Dillon Ward–Reflections on Sundance

My first Banksy.

The story goes rival graffiti artists tried to destroy the original Banksy. The city stepped in, but then drunk guys tried to destroy the original Banksy.

Banksy came to Sundance and left his artwork on the side of a building.
Banksy came to Sundance and left his artwork on the side of a building.

So they put up protective glass.  I’m not sure Banksy would approve. My first Bansky. In Park City.  At the Sundance Film Festival.

Here are two dogs that were the real stars of the festival.  Ralphie & Obvi.

Ralphie & Obvi.
Ralphie & Obvi

My first e-waitlist line on opening night.

ewaitlist line
ewaitlist line

Before this year you had three levels of hierarchy: pass holders, ticket holders and waitlisters. Pass holders were industry, press and rich people. Ticket holders were like the middle class. Waitlisters were like the lower class having to show up 6 hours in advance before a screening to secure a spot.

They changed its policy by introducing an e-waitlist. 2 hours before every showing you signed up for a number.

A screen capture of the ewaitlist number assigned to those fast enough to get one.
A screen capture of the ewaitlist number assigned to those fast enough to get one.

If you didn’t sign up in 30 seconds, all the e-waitlist spots were gone. The server crashed. Many people hated the e-waitlist. I got into everything except one showing. Some weren’t so lucky.

Here’s a fan of “Dead Snow: Red vs. Dead” dressed as a nazi zombie at the midnight premiere.

“Dead Snow: Red vs. Dead”

“Dead Snow: Red vs. Dead”

He snuck up on this girl and scared the daylights out of her. She ended up falling asleep during the screening. I politely told her to stop snoring because some of the cast were sitting behind us.

Because I had the adrenaline pass, which got me into movies before 11am and after 10pm, I was getting 4 hours of sleep every night. On this early morning, the buses were slow.

Utah landscape
Utah landscape

After waiting 30 minutes, I decided to run. It was only a mile, I thought, but the mountain air almost destroyed me. I caught my breath at a stoplight and looked at my phone. I had 10 minutes to get to the theater. No way. Then I heard a woman say, “Do you need a ride?”

I turned and saw a Sundance volunteer leaning out of her driver’s side window. Cars were backed up. She didn’t care. She drove me to the theater. I got there with 5 minutes to spare.

The Sundance Film Festival is the old cliche: a life changing experience.

 

 

 

 

 

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